The Inuit people, living in the icy lands of the Great North have always fascinated Westerners. The movie Nanook of the North filmed by Robert Flaherty in 1922 is considered the first documentary movie ever made. This movie is full of humour and jests, like the Inuit. It shows us the everyday life of a family living of hunting and fishing. We discover the famous igloos, kayaks and dogsleds. Silent movie, Nanook of the North has always been accompanied by musicians.

Singer Tanya Tagaq is the heir of the characteristic singing customs of these people from the North, called Katajjaq or throat-singing. Her unique voice and fertile imagination led her to collaborate with artists from all over the world like Björk or the Kronos Quartet. Her charming voice, combined to the brilliant improvisation of Jesse Zubot and Jean Martin, and the original score of Derek Charke, give the movie a new contemporary perspective.

Choosing this movie and Tanya Tagaq for the launch ceremony of this festival dedicated to the Earth is very symbolic. Arctic ice fields have indeed a role in climate control, and respect of these people and their way of life is a major stake for democracies.

Ciné-concert of Tanya Tagaq is a request of Till Bell Lightbox set in their retrospective. First peoples Cinema : 1500 nations, one tradition.

Credit Sonia Recchia Wireimage Getty for TIFF

Credit Sonia Recchia Wireimage Getty for TIFF